Working in North America 2015


“Canadian Experience” For Immigrants and Newcomers

Social Media Networking

Getting started

NOTE:  Being accepted to come to Canada does not guarantee you employment in Canada in your preferred job or any other job.   

Permanent resident status or citizenship status does not guarantee you employment.   Completion of Employment Option paperwork and/or ELT Work Placement does not guarantee you employment.  It is up to you to find a job and show the employer that you are qualified.  Keep in mind that competition for jobs in Canada is intense. Be prepared for a longer, more difficult search for employment than you might have hoped for.  Overcome the barriers, although it may take months to find a job, and longer if you need to upgrade your skills, your education, your English proficiency or, in the case of regulated trades and professions, become licensed.

Employment Circumstances In Your Favour

Despite the somewhat daunting odds, there are some advantages that immigrants and newcomers may have over established Canadians. It depends on the type of job you’re seeking and the region you settle in.
For instance, employers here know that many newcomers are willing to work longer hours for the same or lesser rate of pay. Other employers value your international experience and different ideas. Additionally, the extra language(s) you speak, aside from English and French, can be very helpful to employers who are trying to reach other Canadians from your ethnic or cultural background, or who are doing business with countries where your language(s) are spoken.

What’s New

    Social Media Networking

About Working in Canada

The Working in Canada Web site provides job seekers, workers and those who are new to the Canadian labour market with the information required to make informed decisions about where to live and work. The site can assist individuals who are searching for work or looking to make career decisions.

www.workingincanada.gc.ca

Planning to work in Canada?

An essential workbook for newcomers

WorkinginCanada.gc.ca is the Government of Canada’s leading source for labour market information. It offers users, free and authoritative occupational and career information such as educational requirements, main duties, wage rates and salaries, current employment trends and outlooks.

To work you must have a Social Insurance Number (SIN) card.

To get one go to a Service Canada office.  Show your landing document or permanent resident card.

Know the rules of the workplace:   There are laws that set out the rights and responsibilities of employees and employers in the workplace.

   

Preparing to work in Canada

Finding a job in Canada may be different from finding a job in your home country.

New immigrants face some significant challenges when trying to get jobs in Canada:

You may also need to learn new job search skills, create a new group of contacts and find out what Canadian employers want.

Research jobs

Before you start looking for work you need to find out what kinds of jobs you are qualified to do. Qualifications are skills, education, work experience, language ability and, in the case of regulated trades and professions, a certificate or licence.



NOC Summary – NOC Code List

Trades_Apprenticeship – Grants 

The Government of Canada’s Apprenticeship Grants provide up to $4,000 in taxable grants to apprentices registered in designated Red Seal trades. A grant is not a loan and does not need to be repaid.

Become a Volunteer in Canada



► 6:30► 6:30

Career Cruising Assessments Overview – US Libraries

www.careercruising.com/…/careercruising/…/CC_Asse…10 Aug 2011 – 7 min
Career Cruising Assessments Overview – US Libraries. Get Flash to see this player. to view full screen


www.workingincanada.gc.ca

Use the Working in Canada Tool to look up your occupation. This government website gives you a detailed report – advertised job openings, job skills and duties, licensing requirements, education and training, wages and other information including career advice from successful recent immigrants and information on bridging and communications programs for newcomers.

Enter a job title:
(ex: teacher, nurse, etc.)

Working in Canada Tool

Jobs – Wages – Qualifications – More!

Working in Canada Tool logo
The Working in Canada Tool can help you make well-informed decisions about where to live and work by producing a report that contains information on job descriptions, wages, skills, language training and job opportunities tailored to your needs.

Working in Canada Tool – A tool that works for you!

Transcript – Working in Canada Tool – A simple tutorial

 Useful Links

 Enter a job title:(e.g. teacher, nurse, etc.)

www.workingincanada.gc.ca



Create a Job Bank Account  www.jobbank.gc.ca     



ADD YOUR WORKING IN CANADA REPORT TO YOUR WORDPRESS NETWORKING SITE



Working in Canada REPORT

BUILD YOUR PORTFOLIO:  Use the Working in Canada Tool and research the internet to produce (copy/paste) a report on job descriptions, wages, skill requirements, language training and job opportunities based on your occupation and a location.  By researching different occupations and different locations, you can make decisions that are right for you and your family. 

Working in Canada Report: This report is produced through the Working in Canada Tool. It will help you identify the name of your occupation in Canada and provide you with a detailed labour market information report (containing job duties, skill requirements, wage rates, etc.) for a chosen location in Canada.

When a Working in Canada Tool Report is generated, the Tool dynamically pulls information from a variety of Government of Canada sources:

Working in Canada – RESOURCES

  By producing a Working in Canada Report, you will learn about job opportunities, job demand, wages, skills requirements, and more. You can find out where the jobs are now and where they will be in the future.

   

PROFESSIONAL WORK PORTFOIO

IMPROVE YOUR PERSONAL WORK PORTFOLIO   

Add typical, behavioral, and situational job interview  questions and your answers.  Also add questions for you to ask the hiring manager during the job interview.  Your questions and answers should be well-thought-out and practiced beforehand while you are relaxed. 



 Working in Canada - Wages and OutlooksCompare wages or outlooks by occupation or location.

Canada Salary Calculator

Getting started

Permanent resident status does not guarantee you employment. It is up to you to find a job and show the employer that you are qualified. It may take months to find a job, and longer if you need to upgrade your skills, your education, your English proficiency or, in the case of regulated trades and professions, become licensed.

To work you must have a Social Insurance Number (SIN) card. To get one go to a Service Canada office. Show your landing document or permanent resident card.

Know the rules of the workplace:  There are laws that set out the rights and responsibilities of employees and employers in the workplace.

About Working in Canada

The Working in Canada Web site provides job seekers, workers and those who are new to the Canadian labour market with the information required to make informed decisions about where to live and work. The site can assist individuals who are searching for work or looking to make career decisions.

WorkinginCanada.gc.ca is the Government of Canada’s leading source for labour market information. It offers users, free and authoritative occupational and career information such as educational requirements, main duties, wage rates and salaries, current employment trends and outlooks.

 

Find job openings

construction workerOnce you know the job or jobs you may be qualified to do, you need to find an employer who needs someone with your skills.

Local opportunities for your job are shown in the Working in Canada Tool.

You can also look for job openings using these methods:

Local job opportunities can be found anywhere from a Help Wanted ad placed in a store window, to ads online or in Windsor’s major newspaper, to major employers who hire recruiters to find a new company official.

Job fairs
Employers work with service partners to hold “job fairs“.  Immigrants are invited to meet employers at these events.

Job websites

 Career Builder International


Workopolis

Workopolis.com is the job website many employers use to advertise job openings.  The site is free for job-seekers.

Job Bank is the large Government of Canada site used by very many employers. New job opportunities are added daily.

INDEED All Jobs


Recruiters
Some companies – particularly those with IT, office or accounting needs – hire a staffing agency to find employees. These agencies advertise positions or seek out people whose skills meet the needs of employers. You should contact these employment agencies and have them add your name and work experience to their database. They CANNOT charge you any fee.

‘Hidden’ job market
Many job openings are not advertised anywhere, creating what seems like a “hidden” job market. Information about available work is often circulated through managers, employees and business associates, as well as through family, friends and acquaintances.

It is said that most Canadian employers do not advertise when they have job openings. That is why we refer to the “hidden” job market. To find opportunities you must “network.” That means doing things such as talking to people you know to find out who is hiring, contacting employers directly, attending job fairs and contacting groups involved in your field of work.

professional woman‘Networking’
Networking means making social contacts. This way you can hear about unadvertised jobs, and employers can hear about you. Here are some methods:

  • Get to know people in your neighbourhood and in your industry or profession. Talk to employment and professional counsellors, employers, and colleagues.
  • By talking to people you will also come to understand your industry and what businesses look when hiring new employees.
  • Join professional associations. Subscribe to their newsletters. Attend professional events and meetings.
  • Attend public meetings and community events.
  • Give and collect business cards.
  • Contact employers directly. Use the internet to find businesses in the area, what they do and their contact information.

Apply for a job

To get a job you must convince employers that it would be to their advantage to hire you. You will need to explain how you are qualified for the job by writing a résumé that explains your education and work experience, or by filling in an application form the employer provides. When you respond to a job advertisement follow the instructions in the ad.

Before you write a resumé you need to know the kind of information Canadian employers are looking for. Résumés here are often different than in other countries. You need to include a “cover letter“. It introduces you and indicates the position for which you’re applying.

Find samples of “Canadian style” resumés and cover letters on websites such as workopolis and Service Canada’s Job Bank.

Canadian employers expect to see references. This usually means people you have worked for in the past who can speak for you. If you have no Canadian work experience this can be difficult. This is why it is important to network – get to know people – so that an employer has someone to phone and ask about your experience and character.

Job interview

The employer reviews paper applications. The next step is to call candidates in for an interview. This could happen quickly or it make take a company weeks to decide who to interview.

Employers usually invite only the most qualified applicants for an interview. An interview could be an informal conversation or it could be a structured format with pre-determined questions in front of a panel of interviewers. You will be expected to discuss, in English, how your qualifications and experience relate to job requirements.

Learn more

scientistYou can learn job search skills including résumé writing and how to conduct yourself in an interview by participating in one of the free workshops or longer programs offered by organizations to provide employment services to newcomers.

There are programs for young people, professionals and skilled workers and entry-level workers, addressing the needs of people with a range of English skills.

These free services have extended programs as well as one-day “workshops.” Participating in these services is also an excellent way to find out about job opportunities and career fairs.

These programs cover topics such as:

  • identifying your personal and transferable skills
  • job search skills
  • learning or upgrading skills such as using computers
  • the rules and customs of the Canadian workplace
  • improving your English for work
  • Some programs provide job placements or introduce participants to employers.

What’s New



WorkforceWindsorEsx WorkforceWindsorEsx · 27 videos

WE•tech Alliance New Technologies Workforce

Workforce•Windsor Essex New Technologies     

Workforce•WEskills Database (Add your resume to the database)

Windsor Essex Parkway




Sign Post to Financial Careers in Canada

  • Accounting, Banking, Insurance, Investments and Wealth Management Occupations

    Welcome to Sign Post

    Sign Post is a revolutionary new tool that will help you assess your readiness for employment in Canada in accounting, banking, insurance, investments and wealth management occupations. Register, Login, OR Learn More about the tool.


Careers in the federal public service for Canadian Citizens

jobs.gc.ca

Information for Canadians:

Public Service Commission

www.psc-cfp.gc.ca

Canadians looking for employment in the federal public service

Applicant testing and assessment

Information on the most commonly used tests, including the General Administration Test (GAT), the General Competency Test (GCT), and the Office Skills Test (OST), is available on the PSC Web site

  • Skill tests: your specific skills, such as typing or welding are assessed
  • Role playing: you are asked to play a particular role, such as a supervisor, to show how you interact with others
  • Work samples: you have the opportunity to show examples of your past work
  • Reference checks: your references may be contacted to confirm your background

What’s New

New Public Service Entrance Exam

The Public Service Commission (PSC) is developing a new Public Service Entrance Exam (PSEE), a three-part test designed to assess:

  • Problem-solving and reasoning ability;
  • Judgement; and
  • Written communication.

The new exam will have an unsupervised internet testing component that will assist in identifying university and college graduates for officer positions across the public service early on in the selection process, via the Post Secondary Recruitment (PSR) program, as well as for hiring by various federal organizations.

Careers in the federal public service for Canadian Citizens

jobs.gc.ca

Information for Canadians:

Public Service Commission

www.psc-cfp.gc.ca

Canadians looking for employment in the federal public service

Applicant testing and assessment

Information on the most commonly used tests, including the General Administration Test (GAT), the General Competency Test (GCT), and the Office Skills Test (OST), is available on the PSC Web site

  • Skill tests: your specific skills, such as typing or welding are assessed
  • Role playing: you are asked to play a particular role, such as a supervisor, to show how you interact with others
  • Work samples: you have the opportunity to show examples of your past work
  • Reference checks: your references may be contacted to confirm your background


Monster.com

Start by becoming a member on Monster.ca.  Need help with this process? Check out Monster.ca Help section.  Upload your resume or CV and mark it as ‘public’ so interested employers can find you.



SOCIAL MEDIA



My personal suggestions:

(1)  Write your Cover Letter to make them say “Where’s the Resume?”

(2) Design your Resume to make them say “Where’s the Person?”

(3) Make your (first) impression during the job interview to make them ask “When can you start?” 

https://lamius.wordpress.com/citizenship/working-in-north-america/

www.workingincanada.gc.ca

Working in Canada Tool – A tool that works for you!

www.workingincanada.gc.ca

Transcript – Working in Canada Tool – A simple tutorial

WORK PORTFOIO:  PROFESSIONAL (PUBLIC) & PERSONAL (PRIVATE)

ADD TO YOUR PRIVATE PORTFOLIO:  Use the Working in Canada Tool to produce (copy/paste) a report on job descriptions, wages, skill requirements, language training and job opportunities based on your occupation and a location.  By researching different occupations and different locations, you can make decisions that are right for you and your family. 

ADD TO YOUR PUBLIC PORTFOLIO (AND TO YOUR WORDPRESS NETWORKING SITE):  Add typical job interview  questions and your answers.  Also add questions for you to ask the hiring manager during the job interview.  Your questions and answers should be well-thought-out and practiced beforehand while you are relaxed. 

Working in Canada Report: This report is produced through the Working in Canada Tool. It will help you identify the name of your occupation in Canada and provide you with a detailed labour market information report (containing job duties, skill requirements, wage rates, etc.) for a chosen location in Canada.

When a Working in Canada Tool Report is generated, the Tool dynamically pulls information from a variety of Government of Canada sources:

Working in Canada – RESOURCES

  By producing a Working in Canada Report, you will learn about job opportunities, job demand, wages, skills requirements, and more. You can find out where the jobs are now and where they will be in the future.

Create a Job Bank Account  www.jobbank.gc.ca     

   

 Career Builder

Workopolis

INDEED All Jobs

 Working in Canada - Wages and OutlooksCompare wages or outlooks by occupation or location.

Canada Salary Calculator

Getting started

Permanent resident status does not guarantee you employment. It is up to you to find a job and show the employer that you are qualified. It may take months to find a job, and longer if you need to upgrade your skills, your education, your English proficiency or, in the case of regulated trades and professions, become licensed.

To work you must have a Social Insurance Number (SIN) card. To get one go to a Service Canada office. Show your landing document or permanent resident card.

Know the rules of the workplace:  There are laws that set out the rights and responsibilities of employees and employers in the workplace.

About Working in Canada

The Working in Canada Web site provides job seekers, workers and those who are new to the Canadian labour market with the information required to make informed decisions about where to live and work. The site can assist individuals who are searching for work or looking to make career decisions.

WorkinginCanada.gc.ca is the Government of Canada’s leading source for labour market information. It offers users, free and authoritative occupational and career information such as educational requirements, main duties, wage rates and salaries, current employment trends and outlooks.

 

Preparing to work in Canada

Finding a job in Canada may be different from finding a job in your home country.

New immigrants face some significant challenges when trying to get jobs in Canada:

You may also need to learn new job search skills, create a new group of contacts and find out what Canadian employers want.

Research jobs

Before you start looking for work you need to find out what kinds of jobs you are qualified to do. Qualifications are skills, education, work experience, language ability and, in the case of regulated trades and professions, a certificate or licence.

Use the Working in Canada Tool to look up your occupation. This government website gives you a detailed report – advertised job openings, job skills and duties, licensing requirements, education and training, wages and other information including career advice from successful recent immigrants and information on bridging and communications programs for newcomers.

Enter a job title:
(ex: teacher, nurse, etc.)

Working in Canada Tool

Jobs – Wages – Qualifications – More!

Working in Canada Tool logo
The Working in Canada Tool can help you make well-informed decisions about where to live and work by producing a report that contains information on job descriptions, wages, skills, language training and job opportunities tailored to your needs.
 Enter a job title:(e.g. teacher, nurse, etc.)

Find job openings

construction workerOnce you know the job or jobs you may be qualified to do, you need to find an employer who needs someone with your skills.

Local opportunities for your job are shown in the Working in Canada Tool.

You can also look for job openings using these methods:

Local job opportunities can be found anywhere from a Help Wanted ad placed in a store window, to ads online or in Windsor’s major newspaper, to major employers who hire recruiters to find a new company official.

Job fairs
Employers work with service partners to hold “job fairs“.  Immigrants are invited to meet employers at these events.

Job websites
Workopolis.com is the job website many employers use to advertise job openings.  The site is free for job-seekers.

Job Bank is the large Government of Canada site used by very many employers. New job opportunities are added daily.

Recruiters
Some companies – particularly those with IT, office or accounting needs – hire a staffing agency to find employees. These agencies advertise positions or seek out people whose skills meet the needs of employers. You should contact these employment agencies and have them add your name and work experience to their database. They CANNOT charge you any fee.

‘Hidden’ job market
Many job openings are not advertised anywhere, creating what seems like a “hidden” job market. Information about available work is often circulated through managers, employees and business associates, as well as through family, friends and acquaintances.

It is said that most Canadian employers do not advertise when they have job openings. That is why we refer to the “hidden” job market. To find opportunities you must “network.” That means doing things such as talking to people you know to find out who is hiring, contacting employers directly, attending job fairs and contacting groups involved in your field of work.

professional woman‘Networking’
Networking means making social contacts. This way you can hear about unadvertised jobs, and employers can hear about you. Here are some methods:

  • Get to know people in your neighbourhood and in your industry or profession. Talk to employment and professional counsellors, employers, and colleagues.
  • By talking to people you will also come to understand your industry and what businesses look when hiring new employees.
  • Join professional associations. Subscribe to their newsletters. Attend professional events and meetings.
  • Attend public meetings and community events.
  • Give and collect business cards.
  • Contact employers directly. Use the internet to find businesses in the area, what they do and their contact information.

Apply for a job

To get a job you must convince employers that it would be to their advantage to hire you. You will need to explain how you are qualified for the job by writing a résumé that explains your education and work experience, or by filling in an application form the employer provides. When you respond to a job advertisement follow the instructions in the ad.

Before you write a resumé you need to know the kind of information Canadian employers are looking for. Résumés here are often different than in other countries. You need to include a “cover letter“. It introduces you and indicates the position for which you’re applying.

Find samples of “Canadian style” resumés and cover letters on websites such as workopolis and Service Canada’s Job Bank.

Canadian employers expect to see references. This usually means people you have worked for in the past who can speak for you. If you have no Canadian work experience this can be difficult. This is why it is important to network – get to know people – so that an employer has someone to phone and ask about your experience and character.

Job interview

The employer reviews paper applications. The next step is to call candidates in for an interview. This could happen quickly or it make take a company weeks to decide who to interview.

Employers usually invite only the most qualified applicants for an interview. An interview could be an informal conversation or it could be a structured format with pre-determined questions in front of a panel of interviewers. You will be expected to discuss, in English, how your qualifications and experience relate to job requirements.

Learn more

scientistYou can learn job search skills including résumé writing and how to conduct yourself in an interview by participating in one of the free workshops or longer programs offered by organizations to provide employment services to newcomers.

There are programs for young people, professionals and skilled workers and entry-level workers, addressing the needs of people with a range of English skills.

These free services have extended programs as well as one-day “workshops.” Participating in these services is also an excellent way to find out about job opportunities and career fairs.

These programs cover topics such as:

  • identifying your personal and transferable skills
  • job search skills
  • learning or upgrading skills such as using computers
  • the rules and customs of the Canadian workplace
  • improving your English for work
  • Some programs provide job placements or introduce participants to employers.

Careers in the federal public service for Canadian Citizens

jobs.gc.ca

Information for Canadians:

Public Service Commission

www.psc-cfp.gc.ca

Canadians looking for employment in the federal public service

Applicant testing and assessment

Information on the most commonly used tests, including the General Administration Test (GAT), the General Competency Test (GCT), and the Office Skills Test (OST), is available on the PSC Web site

  • Skill tests: your specific skills, such as typing or welding are assessed
  • Role playing: you are asked to play a particular role, such as a supervisor, to show how you interact with others
  • Work samples: you have the opportunity to show examples of your past work
  • Reference checks: your references may be contacted to confirm your background

The Canadian Federal Internship for Newcomers (FIN) Program

New Public Service Entrance Exam

The Public Service Commission (PSC) is developing a new Public Service Entrance Exam (PSEE), a three-part test designed to assess:

  • Problem-solving and reasoning ability;
  • Judgement; and
  • Written communication.

The new exam will have an unsupervised internet testing component that will assist in identifying university and college graduates for officer positions across the public service early on in the selection process, via the Post Secondary Recruitment (PSR) program, as well as for hiring by various federal organizations.

https://lamius.wordpress.com/citizenship/working-in-north-america/

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